Press Releases

Solent citizens debate plans for Hampshire devolution, in UK’s first ‘Citizens’ Assembly’

16th November 2015
16 Nov 2015

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Residents want devolution process to be opened up to the public

Press release from the Democracy Matters project

For immediate release, Monday 16th November, 12:00

For more information/quotes, or to arrange interviews or comment pieces, contact: Josiah Mortimer, Communications Officer – Josiah.Mortimer@electoral-reform.org.uk / 07717211630

For more details visit www.citizensassembly.co.uk

  • Residents from Southampton, Portsmouth, Isle of Wight and surrounding areas take part in first ever ‘Citizens’ Assembly’ on local democracy and devolution deals.
  • Citizens at this ground-breaking initiative strongly endorsed the idea that any new devolved body should cover the Hampshire and the Isle of Wight area, with integration of health and social care seen as the top priority
  • Participants were evenly split on whether they support the devolution proposal currently being negotiated with government
  • Citizens want far greater public involvement in Hampshire devolution deal being proposed, and pledge to stay involved in the process, in bid to ‘democratise devolution’

Citizens from the Solent area debated and voted on proposals for a new devolved body in the region, as part of the UK’s first ever ‘Citizens’ Assembly’ [1] on local democracy this weekend.

But residents called for real public involvement and further debate in decisions on devolution at the Citizens’ Assembly, which concluded on Sunday evening (15th November).

Over two weekends of discussion and voting, the nearly 30 participants – drawn from a broadly representative sample from Southampton, Portsmouth, the Isle of Wight and other parts of the Solent area in response to an invitation by polling company YouGov - reached their conclusions through a deep process of engagement with the details of different potential devolution arrangements. The Assembly was chaired by the BBC’s Peter Henley.

‘Assembly South’ was only the second such event in the world to include both citizens and politicians as participants in the process, after the Republic of Ireland. Five local councillors participated alongside the citizens for the four days.

The participants were given unique access to national and local experts to aid them in reaching their own conclusions on how Hampshire and the Isle of Wight should be governed [1]. The project has been closely followed by local councils across the region.

Last weekend saw local politicians and other experts giving evidence to the Assembly, including Cllr Roy Perry, leader of Hampshire County Council. The project is being backed by Alan Whitehead, MP for Southampton Test, who attended the Assembly on Sunday and called it ‘really important and significant’. 

The first weekend in October saw key local figures address the Assembly, including Councillor Stephen Godfrey, Leader of Winchester City Council, Steven Lugg, Chief Executive of the Hampshire Association of Local Councils, and Mike Smith, Director of Cities for Cofely UK and former Director of Finance for Southampton City Council.

Participants voted that if there were to be a new devolved body:

  • It should cover the Hampshire and the Isle of Wight area, instead of other options like the South East or the Solent.
  • Health and social care integration should be the most important priority for the body, followed by public transport, business support and housing investment

When asked to vote on the devolution deal currently on the table in negotiations with the government:

  • There was a dead heat, with participants evenly split on whether they would vote for or against the proposals.

The project, entitled Democracy Matters, has been organised by the University of Southampton, University of Sheffield, University College London and University of Westminster, in conjunction with the Electoral Reform Society, and has been funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) [2].

Hampshire and the Isle of Wight is one of two pilot areas taking part in the experiment, alongside Assembly North in Sheffield. Citizens in the parallel Assembly for the South Yorkshire region gathered on the weekend of the 7th November to reach their conclusions. The 31 participants similarly called for stronger powers for South Yorkshire, as well as a Yorkshire-wide elected Assembly and more democratic engagement in the process.

These Assemblies come in response to the sweeping constitutional changes currently facing the UK, a year on from the Scottish referendum and with key questions of devolution, English Votes for English Laws and the EU referendum currently high up the agenda. 

Katie Ghose, Chief Executive of the Electoral Reform Society, said:

“This Citizens’ Assembly has shown well and truly that when given a chance to have a say, people jump at the opportunity. The Assembly has given citizens a real voice on the government’s plans to hand councils in the Solent area more powers – and they’ve spoken loud and clear. Politicians in Hampshire and across the UK should sit up and take note.

“It’s clear that as the Government seeks to devolve powers towards local areas, they need to include citizens and not simply deliver their chosen solutions from above. So far, many feel left out in the cold by back-room deals.”

Alan Whitehead, MP for Southampton Test said:

“This Citizens’ Assemblies project is something which is really important and significant. I applaud this attempt to bring the public into the devolution process, and it is showing that politics can be done differently.”    

Professor Will Jennings, University of Southampton, Co-Investigator for the project, said:

“This Assembly has challenged the myth that people are disengaged from politics. When they are given the chance to assess a range of different positions and possibilities they do it with gusto - people are more than capable of grappling with complex questions about the way we are governed.

“This marks an important contribution to the conversation about politics and democracy in this country. We have shown there is a real potential for a new way of doing things.”

Professor Gerry Stoker, Professor of Politics and Governance at the University of Southampton

“Instead of devolution being a stitch-up between local and national politicians, we need engagement from citizens to bring new insights and new ideas into the debate. Our Assembly has shown one way that can be done.”

Notes

Read the Hampshire and Isle of Wight devolution bid here: https://www.basingstoke.gov.uk/content/page/40534/Hampshire%20and%20Isle%20of%20Wight%20Devolution%20Prospectus%20September%202015.pdf

1.      The Citizens’ Assemblies are being conducted by Democracy Matters, a group of leading academics from the University of Southampton, the University of Sheffield, University College London, the University of Westminster and the Electoral Reform Society in a project funded by the Economic and Social Research Council. Research Directors from four Constitutional Conventions from countries outside the UK have acted as project advisers. Read the biographies of the project team here: www.citizensassembly.co.uk/home-page/about/project-team/

2.      The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is the UK’s largest funder of research on the social and economic questions facing us today. It supports the development and training of the UK’s future social scientists and also funds major studies that provide the infrastructure for research. ESRC-funded research informs policymakers and practitioners and helps make businesses, voluntary bodies and other organisations more effective. The ESRC also works collaboratively with six other UK research councils and Innovate UK to fund cross-disciplinary research and innovation addressing major societal challenges. The ESRC is an independent organisation, established by Royal Charter in 1965, and funded mainly by the Government. In 2015 it celebrates its 50th anniversary.

For more information visit http://citizensassembly.co.uk/.

For more information/quotes, or to arrange interviews or comment pieces, contact: Josiah Mortimer, Communications Officer – Josiah.Mortimer@electoral-reform.org.uk / 07717211630

Solent citizens to debate and vote on devolution deal

12th November 2015
12 Nov 2015

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  • Press release and invitation to journalists from the Democracy Matters project
  • For immediate release, Thursday 12th November, 12:30
  • For more information/quotes, or to arrange interviews or comment pieces, contact: Josiah Mortimer, Communications Officer – Josiah.Mortimer@electoral-reform.org.uk / 07717211630
  • For more details visit www.citizensassembly.co.uk

Invitation to journalists:

Journalists are invited to attend this weekend’s ‘Citizens’ Assembly’ in Southampton – the final weekend of a major new democratic initiative.

Citizens from across the Solent area will debate and vote on the devolution deals going through in the region on Saturday and Sunday (14th and 15th November), as part of a ground-breaking democratic experiment.

Event details:

  • Venue: Macdonald Botley Park Hotel, Botley, SO32 2UA
  • Times: Saturday: 10:30-16:30, Sunday: 9:30-15:00
  • Interviews with participants and experts can be conducted on Saturday at 13:00 and Sunday 12:30, as well as from 16.30 on Saturday and 15:00 on Sunday.
  • Final votes on the devolution deal will provisionally be around 13:30 on Sunday
  • RSVP to Josiah.Mortimer@electoral-reform.org.uk

Around 30 participants - selected by independent polling company YouGov to be representative of the area – will conclude the second of two weekends of deliberation and voting on the Hampshire and Isle of Wight devolution plans on Sunday. The weekend is being chaired by BBC South’s Peter Henley.

Citizens in the region are experimenting with a new way of doing politics, in response to the constitutional questions facing the UK.

Southampton is one of just two pilot areas taking part in the democratic experiment, titled ‘Democracy Matters’, alongside Sheffield. In Sheffield, citizens in the parallel Assembly for the South Yorkshire area gathered for their final weekend on the 7/8th November and voted to call for a much stronger Northern Powerhouse, and a Yorkshire-wide Assembly.

The Southampton Assembly will vote on similar issues – what powers they believe devolution should cover, what area the deal should encompass, and what they think of the existing devolution plans.

The last weekend in October saw key figures address the Assembly, including Councillor Stephen Godfrey, Leader of Winchester City Council, Steven Lugg, Chief Executive of the Hampshire Association of Local Councils, and Mike Smith, Director of Cities for Cofely UK and former Director of Finance for Southampton City Council.

The project stems from the growing feeling that devolution deals need democratic engagement in order to be sustainable and have popular support, and comes a year on from Scottish referendum - amid backdrop of huge constitutional questions, including English Votes for English Laws, House of Lords reform, the EU referendum and the localism agenda.

The Democracy Matters project has been organised by the University of Southampton, University of Sheffield, University College London and University of Westminster, in conjunction with the Electoral Reform Society, and funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

It is a major academic project, and the first of its kind. Organisers view is as a ground-breaking partnership between universities, civil society and the public. It is the first chance for citizens to properly engage with the government’s devolution plans, North and South.

Katie Ghose, Chief Executive of the Electoral Reform Society, said:

“The Southampton Assembly is a very exciting democratic project to get citizens involved in the democratic future of their cities and indeed the UK. A year on from the Scottish referendum, it’s more vital than ever that the public – particularly in this crucial region for devolution – have a say on where they think power should lie locally.

“As the Government seeks to devolve powers towards local areas, they need to include citizens and not simply deliver their chosen solutions from above. This Citizens’ Assembly is giving local people the chance to come to the fore and shape the devolution agenda. Politicians in the region and across the UK should sit up and take note.

“The Assembly has so far been an exciting demonstration of the fact that people are more than capable of grappling with complex constitutional questions. By creating the space for citizens to inform themselves about the issues and debate with each other, the project has shown the potential for a new kind of democratic politics.”

Professor Will Jennings of the University of Southampton, Co-Investigator for the project, said:

The Southampton Assembly is challenging the myth that people are disengaged from politics. When they are given the chance to assess a range of different positions and possibilities they do it with gusto. This marks an important contribution to the conversation about politics and democracy in this country.”

Professor Matthew Flinders, Principal Investigator for the project, said:

“The government’s devolution plans seem to be moving forward at an incredible pace, so finding new ways to gauge the views and opinion of the public is crucial. The Citizens’ Assembly in Southampton is therefore critical for shaping not just how we think about to the future of English governance but also how we 'do' democracy in these changing times.”

For more information/quotes or to arrange interviews or comment pieces, contact: Josiah Mortimer, Communications Officer – Josiah.Mortimer@electoral-reform.org.uk / 07717211630

Notes

For more information about the Democracy Matters project in Southampton visit http://citizensassembly.co.uk/home-page/southampton/

Research Directors from four Constitutional Conventions from countries outside the UK have acted as project advisers.Read the biographies of the project team here: www.citizensassembly.co.uk/home-page/about/project-team/

The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is the UK’s largest funder of research on the social and economic questions facing us today. It supports the development and training of the UK’s future social scientists and also funds major studies that provide the infrastructure for research. ESRC-funded research informs policymakers and practitioners and helps make businesses, voluntary bodies and other organisations more effective. The ESRC also works collaboratively with six other UK research councils and Innovate UK to fund cross-disciplinary research and innovation addressing major societal challenges. The ESRC is an independent organisation, established by Royal Charter in 1965, and funded mainly by the Government. In 2015 it celebrates its 50th anniversary.

South Yorkshire citizens want stronger Northern Powerhouse

9th November 2015
9 Nov 2015
Tags: 
Deliberative Democracy
Northern Powerhouse

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07979 696 265

For immediate release, Monday 9th November 11:15
Statement from the Democracy Matters project
For more details visit www.citizensassembly.co.uk

  • South Yorkshire citizens call for stronger devolution deal in UK’s first ever ‘Citizens’ Assembly’
  • Citizens vote in favour of Yorkshire & Humber regional assembly as best model of devolution, and call for substantially more powers to be held in Yorkshire
  • Assembly demonstrates citizens’ appetite for grappling with and deciding on complex constitutional issues. Members voice support for citizens in Yorkshire and other areas facing devolution deals to have opportunities for informed and deliberative debate of the kind Assemblies allow

Citizens in South Yorkshire have called for a much stronger devolution deal than the one currently on the table for the Sheffield region.

In the UK’s first ever Citizens’ Assembly, which concluded on Sunday evening (8th November), residents voted in favour of a Yorkshire-wide regional assembly as their preferred model of devolution, and called on local politicians to negotiate with the Government for a much more ambitious and democratic devolution deal.

Over two weekends of deliberation, the 31 participants – drawn as a broadly representative sample from Sheffield, Barnsley, Rotherham and Doncaster in response to an invitation by polling company YouGov – reached their conclusions through a deep process of engagement with the details of different potential devolution arrangements. The participants were given unique access to national and local experts to aid them in reaching their own conclusions on how South Yorkshire should be governed [for more detail see note 1]. The project has been closely followed by Sheffield City Council.

Participants voted by majority:

  1. for the Yorkshire & Humber area to form the basis for regional devolution
  2. for a directly elected regional assembly
  3. for stronger powers for the area to include some tax-setting and law-making powers, so there is real power in the area over issues such as transport infrastructure, economic development and education
  4. if asked to vote today, to reject the devolution deal currently on offer for the Sheffield City Region, but to press local politicians to push for a better deal (stronger, more ambitious, more democratic and based on proper consultation) rather than walk away

The project, entitled Democracy Matters [2], has been organised by the University of Sheffield, University of Southampton, University College London and University of Westminster, in conjunction with the Electoral Reform Society, and funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) [3]. Sheffield is one of two pilot areas taking part in the experiment. In Southampton, citizens in a parallel Assembly for the Hampshire area will gather to reach their conclusions next weekend.

These Assemblies come in response to the sweeping constitutional changes currently facing the UK. In 2012, two out of three voters in Sheffield rejected the option of a directly elected mayor for the city, while in 2015, the City Region Combined Authority committed itself to public consultation on any new governance model.

Katie Ghose, Chief Executive of the Electoral Reform Society, said:

“As the Government seeks to devolve powers towards local areas, they need to include citizens and not simply deliver their chosen solutions from above. This Citizens’ Assembly has given local people the chance to come to the fore and shape the devolution agenda. Politicians should sit up and take note.

“The Assembly has been an exciting demonstration of the fact that people are more than capable of grappling with complex constitutional questions. By creating the space for citizens to inform themselves about the issues and debate with each other, the project has shown the potential for a new kind of democratic politics.”

Professor Matthew Flinders, Principal Investigator for the project, said:

“Assembly members preferred a 'rego' over a 'devo' deal for the future, but they also want a better deal in the here and now. If a vote on the current devolution deal had been held this past weekend, a two-thirds majority of Assembly members would have rejected it. Another vote showed strong opposition to an elected mayor.

“But corresponding votes revealed that Assembly members did not want their leaders to walk away from negotiations. It's not that the Assembly members did not want devolution. What they want is genuine devolution with more powers and stronger accountability.

“It’s simply untrue that people do not care about politics and are disconnected from democracy. What these Assemblies show is that citizens are ready, willing and able to embrace rigorous democratic deliberation.”

Professor Will Jennings, Co-Investigator for the project, said:

“These Assemblies challenge the myth that people are disengaged from politics. When they are given the chance to assess a range of different positions and possibilities they do it with gusto. This marks an important contribution to the conversation about politics and democracy in this country.”

Notes

1.     The first weekend of the Sheffield Assembly in October was opened by Lord (David) Blunkett, who stressed the importance of local people having a say on the future of government in their area. The Chief Executive of Sheffield City Council John Mothersole took questions on the nature of the devolution deal that is currently on the table. Other advocates discussed more radical options for change. In response to members’ requests, the subsequent weekend included a presentation from Councillor Sir Steve Houghton CBE, leader of Barnsley Borough Council, urging the Assembly to embrace the model on offer (a mayor-led combined authority) and play a full part in consultation to be announced next month. In addition there were advocates of a Yorkshire Assembly, and an advocate of sticking to the existing council structure. The project is supported by local politicians including Angela Smith MP and Alan Whitehead MP (for other endorsements see http://citizensassembly.co.uk/home-page/about/).

2.     The Citizens’ Assemblies are being conducted by Democracy Matters, a group of leading academics from the University of Sheffield, the University of Southampton, University College London, the University of Westminster and the Electoral Reform Society in a project funded by the Economic and Social Research Council. Research Directors from four Constitutional Conventions from countries outside the UK have acted as project advisers.Read the biographies of the project team here: www.citizensassembly.co.uk/home-page/about/project-team/

3.     The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is the UK’s largest funder of research on the social and economic questions facing us today. It supports the development and training of the UK’s future social scientists and also funds major studies that provide the infrastructure for research. ESRC-funded research informs policymakers and practitioners and helps make businesses, voluntary bodies and other organisations more effective. The ESRC also works collaboratively with six other UK research councils and Innovate UK to fund cross-disciplinary research and innovation addressing major societal challenges. The ESRC is an independent organisation, established by Royal Charter in 1965, and funded mainly by the Government. In 2015 it celebrates its 50th anniversary.

For more information visit http://citizensassembly.co.uk/. To arrange interviews or further comment contact Will Brett (07979 696 265 / will.brett@electoral-reform.org.uk)

Durham devolution referendum welcome, but real region-wide debate now needed

30th October 2015
30 Oct 2015

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Electoral Reform Society says devolution plans could ‘flounder’ without real public involvement

Statement from the Electoral Reform Society, 30th October 2015

Commenting on the news that there will be a referendum in County Durham over the North East devolution deal, Darren Hughes, Deputy Chief Executive of the Electoral Reform Society, said:

“It’s welcome news that the public in County Durham will now be able to vote on the North East devolution deal, but there needs to be a real debate across the North East on this – not just one part. As things stand, if Durham voters kick out the proposals, the deal will still go through - potentially causing both confusion and anger. We can go much further than one localised referendum: devolution is a crucial change to democracy that we have to get right and that the public have to be behind if it is to work.

“The public shouldn’t just be given a yes/no option on a pre-agreed deal – we can’t have a fait accompli approach to devolution. There should be proper and meaningful consultation on the deal itself – what powers the public want the Combined Authority to have, and what they want their councils to do and look like in the 21st century.
“A piecemeal approach to engaging the public in the devolution debate isn’t sustainable. If citizens in County Durham are to be given a vote, it’s only right that citizens across the region should too.

“The Combined Authority said the public across the North East would be consulted – and we’ve yet to see what this will look like. It can’t be a tick-box exercise – instead it must be a real process of deliberative democracy, with the ability for the public to change aspects of the deal which they want to be improved. Local ‘Citizens’ Assemblies,’ like the ones we are running in Sheffield and Southampton, could be a great start.

“Let’s have a real debate about devolution and decentralisation. The ERS and leading academics are currently holding Citizens Assemblies in North and South that offer a promising model to follow in terms of engaging local people in the devolution agenda. Politicians in the region and the UK government would do well to watch them and build on them as a way to open up these discussions about where power should lie in our regions.”

For more information about the ‘Citizens’ Assemblies’ project, see here: citizensassembly.co.uk

Contact Josiah Mortimer, ERS Communications Officer, on 07717211630 for more information, quotes or to arrange an interview.

Lobbying (Scotland) Bill should go much further

30th October 2015
30 Oct 2015

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07940 523 842

Electoral Reform Society respond to the Scottish Government’s Lobbying (Scotland) Bill

• A small move in the right direction, but needs to catch up with modern world, say campaigners
• Lobbying (Scotland) Bill should also cover spending, email, phone and written communications

Statement from the Electoral Reform Society
For immediate release, 30th October 2015

A coalition of campaign groups have called on the Scottish government to go 'much further' than the draft Lobbying Bill released today.

The Electoral Reform Society, Unlock Democracy and Common Weal have welcomed the principle that action should be taken to regulate lobbying, but the bill still leaves many important aspects of lobbying hidden from public view.

This morning the Scottish Government published the Lobbying (Scotland) Bill, which requires most organisations seeking to influence public policy to record their face-to-face meetings with politicians on a register.

Willie Sullivan, Director of Electoral Reform Society Scotland, said:

“If we accept that the public should know if corporations and big interests are talking to politicians in order to shape policy for their benefit, then it seems logical that we should know when they’re emailing, phoning or writing to them.

“As it currently stands, the bill only makes provision for face-to-face meetings, which is out of step with the way people communicate in the modern world. All these other forms of lobbying will remain secret. This bill would be a beacon of transparency in the 19th century, but it fails to live up to the expectations of an electorate which lives in a digital age.”

Alexandra Runswick, Director of Unlock Democracy, said

"Scotland's lobbyists will breathe a sigh of relief on reading this bill. The proposed register will cover only a fraction of the lobbying that takes place in and around Holyrood. The SNP said they wanted to make Scotland more transparent than the rest of the UK. Instead they have published a bill which is full of handy loopholes for lobbyists. With these proposals, the government has wasted a golden opportunity to bring lobbying out into the open.

“Scotland needs a proper, comprehensive lobbying register. We call on MSPs to strengthen the bill and give the public a full picture of how lobbying affects decisions made in government. Otherwise it will be business as usual for lobbying in Scotland."

Robin McAlpine, Director of the Common Weal, said:

"In this conception of 'transparency' you can spend as much money as you want doing anything at all you want to  distort the political process in any way you want and the overwhelming principle is that the public must absolutely not be allowed to know about it."

ENDS

For more information, quotes or to arrange an interview, contact Willie Sullivan, Director Electoral Reform Society Scotland, on 07940 523 842 or willie.sullivan@electoral-reform.org.uk
 

Poll: Just one in ten think Lords should remain unelected

28th October 2015
28 Oct 2015

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Electoral Reform Society respond to government’s announcement on House of Lords reform with new polling

  • Government review of Lords must deal with need for elected upper chamber, says ERS
  • 48% think the Lords should be an elected chamber, while 22% back abolition
  • Just 10% think House of Lords should remain as it is

Statement from the Electoral Reform Society

For immediate release, 14:00, 28th October 2015

For more information, quotes or to arrange an interview, contact Josiah Mortimer, ERS Communications Officer, on 07717211630 or josiah.mortimer@electoral-reform.org.uk

The Electoral Reform Society have released polling today [1] showing that just 10% of the public think that the House of Lords should remain a fully-unelected chamber.

The findings follow last night’s announcement by the government that they will be launching a review into the powers of the House of Lords, led by Conservative hereditary peer Lord Strathclyde.

The polling, by BMG Research [2], found that 48% of the public think the Lords should be an elected chamber, while 22% back abolition. That compares to only one in ten who back the unelected status quo.

Darren Hughes, Deputy Chief Executive of the Electoral Reform Society [3], said:

“While this review is welcome, the public clearly want real reform of the House of Lords – not just tinkering around the edges. 70% want radical reform of our upper chamber, while only one in ten back the unelected status quo. The time for root and branch reform is now - it is simply wrong in a modern democracy for legislators to remain unelected.

“The government are tying themselves in knots over the question of Lords reform, with George Osborne saying he supports an elected upper house, while this review only looks at the issue of conventions. They shouldn’t be making changes to our constitution out of partisan interest, just because they lost a couple of votes - they have to deal with the crux of the matter: the make-up of the constitutional calamity that is the House of Lords.

“Instead of simply emasculating our revising chamber, they should ensure it has the legitimacy it needs to be a real check on executive power. That can only happen through electing it.

“This review needs opening up to the public. It can’t be left to ‘the great and the good’ to decide on Britain’s constitutional future behind closed doors. A national debate is now needed about the nature of the House of Lords – and it has to deal with the issue of electing all those who vote on our laws. It is expensive, over-sized and archaic – and the public know it.

“We have a crisis of democracy in this country – a government handed a majority on just 37% of the vote, and on the other side a house with too many political hacks and cronies. Two wrongs don’t make a right, and two democratically-dubious chambers look pretty ridiculous shouting about each other’s alleged illegitimacy.”

Hughes added:

“Now’s the time for looking at both Houses to deal with the democratic deficit in Britain – an unfair and out-of-date voting system in the Commons, and an expensive and archaic set-up in the Lords. 

“The public won’t settle for half-way house Lords reform. If the government is serious about dealing with the ‘constitutional crisis’ our democracy is in, they should ensure the public get a say at last in who represents us in the upper chamber.”  

For more information, quotes or to arrange an interview, contact Josiah Mortimer, ERS Communications Officer, on 07717211630 or josiah.mortimer@electoral-reform.org.uk

Notes

For more of the ERS’ research on the House of Lords, see our recent report, “The House of Lords: Fact vs Fiction”. For headline figures see here.

The ERS will be putting out a wide range of polling on democratic and constitutional issues, including the Lords, proportional representation, and party funding, over the next month. For more information contact Josiah Mortimer (details above). 

[1] Polling by BMG Research of 1,504 residents aged 18+ in the UK, conducted between 22nd and 27th October 2015. Full cross-tabs are available here.

[2] BMG Research: http://www.bmgresearch.co.uk/

[3] A photo of Darren Hughes is available for free use here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/wg22swb8dz3hb7m/darren%20hughes%20-%20credit%20gus%20palmer.jpg?dl=0

The ERS calculated on Monday that packing the Lords with 100 extra Conservative Peers would cost at least £2.6m per year in expenses and allowances - before extra office, infrastructure and staffing costs are taken into account - https://t.co/oXgNBPFIYK

The ERS’ logo is available for free use here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/co61g3209r2okcd/ERS%20Logo%20colour%20on%20white%20348%20x%20220.jpg?dl=0

ERS: PM’s ‘rapid review’ of Lords can deal with ‘regret’ over lack of reform

27th October 2015
27 Oct 2015

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  • Statement from the Electoral Reform Society
  • For immediate release, 27th October 2015
  • For more information, quotes or to arrange an interview, contact Josiah Mortimer, ERS Communications Officer, on 07717211630 or josiah.mortimer@electoral-reform.org.uk

Responding to comments from the Prime Minister saying there will be a ‘rapid review’ of the House of Lords [1] following yesterday’s votes on tax credits, Darren Hughes, Deputy Chief Executive of the Electoral Reform Society [2], said:

“The Prime Minister said over the summer that he ‘regrets’ not reforming the House of Lords in the last Parliament [3]. After yesterday’s vote he must be regretting that mistake more than ever. Thankfully, it’s not too late.

“The government are now promising a ‘rapid review’ of the House of Lords following their defeat in the upper chamber. This should have been done long ago. But a review can’t simply mean tinkering around the edges or packing the second chamber with yet more donors and ex-politicians, at a cost of over £2.6m per year in expenses and allowances [4]. The government has appointed Peers at the fastest rate in history into what is an already-bloated chamber.

“We need root and branch reform of the unelected upper chamber - not based on partisan interest, but because it’s wrong in a modern democracy for our legislators to be unelected.

 “We have a crisis of democracy in this country – a government handed a majority on just 37% of the vote, and on the other side a house with too many political hacks and cronies. Two wrongs don’t make a right, and two democratically-dubious chambers look pretty ridiculous shouting about each others’ alleged illegitimacy.

“Now’s the time for looking at both Houses to deal with the democratic deficit in Britain – an unfair and out-of-date voting system in the Commons, and an expensive and archaic set-up in the Lords.  

“The public won’t settle for half-way house Lords reform. If the government is serious about dealing with the ‘constitutional crisis’ our democracy is in, they should ensure the public get a say at last in who represents us in the upper chamber.   

ENDS

For more information, quotes or to arrange an interview, contact Josiah Mortimer, ERS Communications Officer, on 07717211630 or josiah.mortimer@electoral-reform.org.uk

Notes

For more of the ERS’ research on the House of Lords, see our recent report, “The House of Lords: Fact vs Fiction”. For headline figures see here.

[1] As reported here and elsewhere: http://www.itv.com/news/update/2015-10-26/pm-calls-for-rapid-review-after-tax-cuts-defeat-in-lords/

[2] A photo of Darren Hughes is available for free use here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/wg22swb8dz3hb7m/darren%20hughes%20-%20credit%20gus%20palmer.jpg?dl=0

 [3] As reported here and elsewhere: http://www.theguardian.com/politics/video/2015/jul/28/david-cameron-house-of-lords-video

 [4] The ERS calculated yesterday that packing the Lords with 100 extra Conservative Peers would cost at least £2.6m per year in expenses and allowances - before extra office, infrastructure and staffing costs are taken into account - https://t.co/oXgNBPFIYK

The ERS’ logo is available for free use here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/co61g3209r2okcd/ERS%20Logo%20colour%20on%20white%20348%20x%20220.jpg?dl=0

Campaigners call for Lords to reject ‘rushed’ registration changes

26th October 2015
26 Oct 2015

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  • Statement from the Electoral Reform Society
  • Embargoed for 00:01, 27th October 2015
  • For more information, quotes or to arrange an interview, contact Josiah Mortimer, ERS Communications Officer, on 07717211630 or josiah.mortimer@electoral-reform.org.uk

The Electoral Reform Society is calling on the House of Lords to vote down plans to ‘rush through’ changes to electoral registration on Tuesday (27th October).

The campaigning body has written to Peers urging them to repeal plans to bring forward the shift to Individual Electoral Registration a year ahead of schedule.

Peers will hear Lord Tyler’s motion asking for the early shift to be annulled [1] - a call that is backed by the Electoral Reform Society as well as the Electoral Commission.

Darren Hughes [2], Deputy Chief Executive of the Electoral Reform Society [3], said:

“The fact that 1.9m people risk being excluded by the government’s wrong-headed early shift to complete individual voter registration – against Electoral Commission advice – is a scandal. We should be looking at automatic registration, as happens in many other countries - otherwise millions of people could lose their voice.

“We call on the government to listen to the experts and to delay the early shift to IER, so that those 1.9m people aren’t excluded. To rush through these changes would pose major risks to people’s rights, and we back attempts by Peers in the Lords to call for a rethink.

 “The poorest constituencies are being hit twice as hard as the richest areas by the early shift to IER [4], so this is a deeply concerning move. On top of that, the boundary changes could mean richer areas are over-represented compared to poor ones, as the re-drawing of constituencies will be based on the number of registered voters, rather than the area’s population. Since poorer areas have lower registration rates, those areas with the greatest need could end up being the least represented.

“Fundamentally though, we need a registration revolution in this country, alongside real democratic reform, to ensure political equality.”

For more information, quotes or to arrange an interview, contact Josiah Mortimer, ERS Communications Officer, on 07717211630 or josiah.mortimer@electoral-reform.org.uk

NOTES

[1] The debate is expected to be around 3pm

[2] A photo of Darren Hughes is available for free use here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/wg22swb8dz3hb7m/darren%20hughes%20-%20credit%20gus%20palmer.jpg?dl=0

[3] The ERS’ logo is available for free use here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/co61g3209r2okcd/ERS%20Logo%20colour%20on%20white%20348%20x%20220.jpg?dl=0

[4] According to research by Hope Not Hate, analysed by the ERS, the poorest 10 areas in the country will have double the level of electoral registration ‘drop off’ as the wealthiest 10 areas if the early move to IER goes forward a year ahead of schedule. 

PM’s threat to pack Lords with Tory Peers would cost £2.6m

26th October 2015
26 Oct 2015

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07717211630
  • Statement from the Electoral Reform Society
  • For immediate release, 26th October 2015
  • For more information, quotes or to arrange an interview, contact Josiah Mortimer, ERS Communications Officer, on 07717211630 or josiah.mortimer@electoral-reform.org.uk

The Electoral Reform Society have calculated that plans to ‘stuff’ the House of Lords with 100 extra Conservative Peers [1] if Lords today reject cuts to tax credits would cost at least £2.6m per year [2].

The findings come ahead of today’s votes on changes to tax credits in the upper house [3]. The Society have challenged the Prime Minister to introduce an elected upper chamber if he is serious about tackling any potential ‘constitutional crisis’ – instead of adding up to 100 extra Tory Peers.

Darren Hughes, Deputy Chief Executive of the Electoral Reform Society [4], said:

“If the Prime Minister is worried about a constitutional crisis following today’s House of Lords votes, he should reform the chamber so that it’s elected – instead of trying to pack it with pliant Peers.

“We need a fairly-elected upper chamber that has a clear definition of its responsibilities – instead of the government claiming that an unelected upper chamber is a wonderful revising body, but then threatening to pack it with cronies if it doesn’t vote the way Ministers want it to.

“A chamber built on vague conventions and illegitimacy is no way to deal with legislation, and is simply asking for constitutional chaos and confusion. 

“An additional 100 Peers would take the Lords to nearly a thousand members, at a cost of at least £2.6m in extra expenses and allowances per year. And the actual cost is likely to be much higher, since that figure doesn’t take into account the increased staffing, office and infrastructure costs 100 extra Peers would entail.

“Between February 2014 to January 2015, £21 million was spent on handouts to members of the House of Lords, with the average Peer receiving £25,826 tax-free – despite the chamber only sitting for about 130 days of the year.

“Adding an extra 100 Tory Lords at a time of austerity would not only be unpalatable but would be frankly scandalous – and a constitutional crisis in its own right. It’s time for real reform – not the undemocratic and partisan packing of our legislature.”

ENDS

For more information, quotes or to arrange an interview, contact Josiah Mortimer, ERS Communications Officer, on 07717211630 or josiah.mortimer@electoral-reform.org.uk

Notes

For more of the ERS’ research on the House of Lords, see our recent report, “The House of Lords: Fact vs Fiction”. For headline figures see here.

[1] As reported here and elsewhere: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/georgeosborne/11944957/Lords-poised-to-back-down-over-bid-to-kill-off-tax-credit-cuts.html

[2] Cost based on average expenses and allowances claimed by Peers in the 2014-2015 session – £25,826. However, the actual cost is likely to be higher, since the net operating costs of the House of Lords in 2013-4 was £93.1m – equivalent to around £118k per Peer.  

[3] The debate is expected to begin around 3pm.

[4] A photo of Darren Hughes is available for free use here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/wg22swb8dz3hb7m/darren%20hughes%20-%20credit%20gus%20palmer.jpg?dl=0

The ERS’ logo is available for free use here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/co61g3209r2okcd/ERS%20Logo%20colour%20on%20white%20348%20x%20220.jpg?dl=0

We can’t leave it to ‘great and the good’ alone to decide on Britain’s constitutional future.

22nd October 2015
22 Oct 2015
Tags: 
EVEL

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Electoral Reform Society says It’s time to take the English Votes for English Laws debate outside of Westminster.

Statement from the Electoral Reform Society
For immediate release – 22nd October 2015, 17:00

Regarding plans to introduce 'English Votes for English Laws', Katie Ghose, Chief Executive of the Electoral Reform Society, said:

“The introduction of English Votes for English Laws would be a highly significant change, not just to voting procedure but to the future of the relationship with devolved nations and UK democracy. These proposals have constitutional consequences beyond changes to parliamentary procedure – so it’s vital that citizens have a say.

“This significant change should be considered alongside other constitutional issues, with the input of the UK public as part of a citizen-led constitutional convention. We can’t leave it to ‘great and the good’ alone to decide on Britain’s constitutional future.

“So far, citizens’ engagement in the EVEL and devolution debates has been limited – but the appetite is there.

“Leading academics in conjunction with the Electoral Reform Society have just this week launched an important new democratic initiative to help deal with these profound constitutional changes – ‘Citizens’ Assemblies’ in Sheffield and Southampton on where power should lie locally.

“Citizen involvement is crucial for public confidence and the sustainability of Britain’s constitution. It’s time to take the debate outside of Westminster.”

Contact Josiah Mortimer, ERS Communications Officer, on 07717211630 for more information, quotes or to arrange an interview.